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Fossils from Monmouth County, New Jersey

Sand tiger (Eostriatolamia holmdelensis aka Carcharias holmdelensis)

Age – Late Cretaceous; Commonality – Less Common; Size – average: ½ inch, max: ¾ inch This shark is named after the town of Holmdel and is the second species of Carcharias present. This is the only sand tiger that has striations. The anterior teeth are slender and lateral teeth are curved slightly and can have secondary cusplets on them. They resemble Carcharias samhammeri teeth in other aspects.

First Lower Anterior (Parasymphyseal) Tooth

Lingual View

Labial View

Sand Tiger Shark Cretaceous (Eostriatolamia holmdelensis) Parasymphyseal tooth, New Jersey

Profile View of Distal Side

Profile View of Mesial Side

Parasymphyseal E. holmdelensis teeth are scarcer than the other tooth positions of the species. They are smaller and not as symmetrical as the other teeth. The largest root in a symphyseal tooth points away from the symphysis unlike the anterior teeth, which have their largest root pointing toward the symphysis.

Anterior Teeth

Lingual View

Sand Tiger Shark Cretaceous (Eostriatolamia holmdelensis) Anterior tooth, New Jersey

Labial View

Profile View of Mesial Side

The anterior teeth are long and slender. They are relatively straight and have fairly strong striations. This adult tooth is a lower anterior (likely an a2).

Lingual View

Labial View

Profile View of Mesial Side

This tooth is from an adult shark and is an upper anterior (likely an A1).

Lingual View

Labial View

Profile View of Mesial Side

This tooth is probably from an adult shark and is a lower anterior (likely an a3).

Lingual View

Labial View

Profile View of Mesial Side

Profile View of Distal Side

This tooth is another lower anterior (likely an a3) and is very similar to the one above.

Lingual View

Labial View

Profile View of Mesial Side

This tooth has a large crown in comparison to its root and cusplets and is a lower anterior (likely an a1).

Lingual View

Labial View

Profile View of Mesial Side

This upper anterior tooth is either an A2 or an A3.

Lingual View

Labial View

Profile View of Mesial Side

This is another upper anterior tooth and is either an A2 or an A3, like the one above.

Intermediate Tooth

Lingual View

Sand Tiger Shark Cretaceous (Eostriatolamia holmdelensis) Intermediate tooth, New Jersey

Labial View

Profile View of Mesial Side

Intermediate teeth are scarcer than the other types of teeth; they are about as common as the parasymphyseals. A single file of intermediate teeth are positioned between the last anterior tooth and first lateral tooth in the upper jaw of some sharks. They are often (though not always) smaller than the neighboring teeth; it seems like they are smaller than the anterior teeth and approximately the same size as the lateral teeth in E. holmdelensis. They are angled distally when in the jaw in most species, including E. holmdelensis.

Lateral Teeth

Lingual View

Sand Tiger Shark Cretaceous (Eostriatolamia holmdelensis) Lateral tooth, New Jersey

Labial View

Profile View of Distal Side

Profile View of Mesial Side

This tooth is an upper lateral. Upper lateral teeth are smaller (shorter) than anterior teeth and are also much more slanted distally. Their width to length ratio is greater than in anteriors. Their striations are slightly weaker than on anteriors.

Lingual View

Labial View

Profile View of Mesial Side

Profile View of Distal Side

This upper anterior tooth is very similar to the one above.

Lingual View

Labial View

Profile View of Mesial Side

Lower laterals are more symmetrical than the anteriors in E. holmdelensis. They are erect and bear a resemblance to S. texanus lower laterals.

Lingual View

Labial View

Profile View of Distal Side

This tooth is another lower lateral. This one has a lower crown than the one above. It also has a cusplet feature that is consistently associated with sand tigers. Its mesial cusplet is lower and more bent distally than the distal cusplet. Sometimes it is rather the distal cusplet which has that specific shape, as seen on the last of the anterior teeth shown on this page.

Posterior Teeth

Lingual View

Labial View

Profile View of Distal Side

Profile View of Mesial Side

This tooth is an upper posterior. Upper posteriors are even more curved distally than the upper laterals. It also seems like they have a larger lingual protuberance and nutrient groove.

Lingual View

Labial View

Profile View of Mesial Side

Profile View of Distal Side

This is a lower posterior tooth. Lower posterior teeth resemble lower lateral teeth, but are slightly more angled distally. The striations are also less prominent.

Lingual View

Sand Tiger Shark Cretaceous (Eostriatolamia holmdelensis) Posterior tooth, New Jersey

Labial View

Profile View of Mesial Side

This tooth is another lower posterior. It is from further back in the mouth in comparison to the one shown above.

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