NJfossils.com

Fossils from Monmouth County, New Jersey

Crocodiles (Crocodilia)

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Teeth

Lateral View

Anterior View

Posterior View

Basal View

Anteriormost tooth. This position seems to be less common than the position the two below are from.

Lateral View

Lateral View

Anterior/Posterior View

Basal View

Occlusal View

Anterior (but not anteriormost) tooth. This one is the typical tooth form seen.

Lateral View

Lateral View

Anterior/Posterior View

Basal View

Occlusal View

Another anterior tooth from a similar position as the one above. This one has a tiny bit of in vivo wear visible at the crown apex. It is basically at the maximum size for New Jersey Croc teeth at 5/8 inches.

Lateral View

Lateral View

Anterior/Posterior View

Basal View

Occlusal View

This tooth came from a posterior position. These seem to be less common than anterior teeth.

Lateral View

Lateral View

Anterior View

Posterior View

Basal View

This tooth has a strange shape. There is definitely more than one species present, which coupled with variation and wear makes it hard to even attribute a tooth to a position. In sharks you would likely figure out the species before the position; in Croc teeth, however, a species level identification is impractical most of the time in NJ because of not many associated remains, but since Croc teeth of different species are very similar, there is a chance one can be assigned to a position.

Osteoderms

External surface

Internal surface

This is a fairly large chunk of osteoderm at ~1 inch. Crocodile osteoderms are dimpled on one side and are smooth on the other. They are usually always fragmentary. The osteoderms, which were located under the skin, served as body armor and helped regulate the crocodilian’s body temperature.

External surface

Internal surface

This osteoderm shows the dimples more clearly. It is easy to confuse Croc osteoderms with Trionyx sp. turtle shell pieces. The turtle shell pieces are more bony, are thicker, and have shallower, more even dimples.

External surface

Internal surface

This osteoderm is probably about half complete. The line running on the external surface is the middle of the osteoderm.

Vertebra

Dorsal View

Ventral View

Anterior View

Posterior View

Caudal-Lateral View

Possible juvenile Croc vertebra (there is a small chance it could actually be from one of the small terrestrial reptiles). Croc vertebrae generally have larger joint stubs than Mosasaur verts. IDd with the help of John W. and Steve B.

Skull Fragment

External surface

Internal surface

Skull fragments are similar to osteoderms, but have more irregular divots and have a backside that has a different surface texture. This one has a piece on the backside that would have jointed to the rest of the skull. Usually the pieces of Croc skull are from the top of the skull (that is why they resemble the “regular” Croc osteoderms). ID verified by John W.

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